7 thoughts on “Blue Grain Beach

    1. I’ve spent the last two days looking at cyanotypes, tintypes and cabinet cards online (on eBay and Etsy mainly). I ended up purchasing a few because they’re so inexpensive. An absolutely gorgeous historic process (cyanotypes); definitely my inspiration for this group.

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      1. So let me understand (you may remember I’m a novice when it comes to photography). You’re saying you purchased some older, original cyanotypes (I’m assuming very few are done any more) and studied the prints, and then, inspired, processed your photos digitally in that style? Starting with Silver efex?
        Cabinet cards, I haven’t even heard of – I will have to check that out. Thanks for telling me what led to the images.

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        1. I’ve been looking at a lot of books with photographs made with vintage processes, but that’s been over the last few years really. After I posted this trio I became curious about picking up an original cyanotype or two, and that’s when I started looking online.

          The original cyanotypes seem to have a lot of range in terms of blue saturation. Truthfully, this trio of images I posted are about 80% less saturated than most of the turn-of-the-century originals.

          If I group them into a gallery, maybe I should call them “Kinda Blue.” 🙂

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        2. “cabinet cards” are the ones which started being produced in the late 1870’s– almost always portraits (formal studio shots printed as 5 x 7’s, often with the photographer’s logo at the bottom and sometimes on the back). The earlier ones are albumen prints and have a lovely sepia sheen. I’ll bet you have some cabinet cards somewhere :)… they’re often the pictures we save of great-grandparents, grandparents and other folks from the end of the 19th century. Behind the subjects, you’ll often find elaborate painted backdrops. Love ’em. Especially because they’re small.

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